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Microsoft Azure Sphere chip for end-to-end IoT security from the Cloud to Network Edge

“MediaTek is a good partner [for Microsoft] to have for its Azure Sphere secure IoT chip,” said Laura DiDio, principal analyst with ITIC. “They will provide a Wi-Fi controller, the processor will run Microsoft’s Linux-based IoT OS and you’ve now got a highly secure, connected device at a decent price point.”

Channel Futures, April 17, 2018

Microsoft Reorganization:

“Microsoft has actually been moving away from Windows and more towards the cloud, analytics and AI for the past ten years,” explained Laura DiDio, an analyst at ITIC. “This did not happen overnight.” DiDio pointed out that Nadella has made major changes quickly during his tenure. “That’s the way you have to move,” to stay relevant, she said. “You’ve got to be agile to stay ahead of the game.”

The changes don’t mean that Microsoft is totally giving up on Windows, DiDio said. But they do mean that Nadella is focusing the company’s energies around stronger assets.

“They’re de-emphasizing Windows,” she said, in order to become a stronger “player in cloud and artificial intelligence, because that’s where the money is.”

CNN Money, March 29, 2018

Failure to deliver reliability and uptime:

“Time is money,” DiDio says. “Systems, networks and connectivity devices are subject to failure. If the downtime persists for any significant length of time, it can be expensive in terms of monetary losses. It can disrupt operations, decrease worker productivity and negatively impact the organization’s business partners, customers and suppliers.

“A security outage of any significant duration can also be a PR nightmare and damage the company’s reputation, causing lost business,” DiDio says. “Reliability and uptime go hand in hand with a comprehensive, detailed backup and disaster recovery plan that also includes an internal operational level agreement that designates a chain of command in the event of any type of service disruption.”

Every organization should have a disaster recovery plan that includes an itemized list of who to contact at vendor organizations, cloud and third-party service providers, DiDio says. “The CISO should also know what the company’s contracts stipulate as the response time from vendors, cloud, and third-party service providers to respond to and thwart security incidents and track down the hackers,” she says.

CSO Online, November 21, 2017

Cal State University and Hartnell College Launching Cohort Program:

“Since 2013, the two institutions have promoted this program as a way to attract minorities, women and students who are the first in their families to attend college to Computer Science and STEM subjects. The Cohort program nurtures these students by having them take their CS classes as a group.” DiDio says. It also helps them adjust more quickly to college life by providing them with group study and life skills classes to help them stick with CS as a major and graduate.

“So far, so good. A 75% majority of students enrolled in the CSUMB/Hartnell CS Cohort program graduate. This is well above the national average of about 30%,” DiDio notes.

ITIC Corp, November 17, 2017

Burger King Ad Creates Whopper of a Mess:

“In the Internet of Things environment, where you can have “an ecosystem or ecosystems of ecosystems interconnected, the attack vector universe is potentially limitless,” noted Laura DiDio, research director for IoT at 451 Research.

The risks are “everywhere, and what you can do is mitigate risk to an acceptable level,” she told the E-Commerce Times — but that requires vendors to make secure products.

E-Commerce Times, April 13, 2017

United Airlines Customer Service Snafus:

United’s behavior was “cavalier and callous,” said Laura DiDio, research director for IoT at 451 Research.

“The deck is stacked against passengers these days,” she told CRM Buyer.

However, this situation “is a PR nightmare for United Airlines,” DiDio added, “and it’s not going away.”

CRMBuyer, April 11, 2017

June 23rd, 2011
12:04pm

Hackers have had a bonanza in April, May and June (so far). Nary has a day gone by without news of yet another major attack. Here’s a partial list of some of the most publicized hacks of the last 10 weeks:

RSA Security: On April 1, in a move akin to raiding Fort Knox, RSA’s Secure ID technology (one of the industry’s gold standards in security software) was hacked. RSA executives described the hack as “very sophisticated.” They characterized it as an advanced persistent threat (APT)-type targeted attack. It used a routine tactic – a phishing Email that contained an infected attachment that was triggered when opened.

Epsilon:  This Irving, TX –based company handles customer email messaging for over 150 firms, including large banks and retailers like Best Buy, JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup and L.L.Bean. In April, millions of consumers learned that Epsilon’s networks were breached when they received Emails from their banks and credit card companies informing them that the hack might have exposed their names and Email addresses to the hackers. Epsilon released a statement assuring consumers that only Email addresses and names were compromised and that no sensitive data was disclosed.

Sony: Sony’s PlayStation gaming network suffered a series of massive security attacks in April/May that affected more than 100 million online accounts and shuttered the site for days. Sony executives estimate the hacks cost the Japanese electronics firm $170 million.

Lockheed Martin: On May 21, the aerospace giant released a statement saying its internal information systems network had been penetrated by what it called a “significant and tenacious” attack. The company declined to divulge details other than stating that “no customer, program or employee personal data had been compromised.”

Public Broadcasting System: the PBS website was hacked in mid-May and the perpetrators planted an erroneous story stating that deceased rapper Tupac Shakur was alive in New Zealand. The group that claimed credit for the hacking was apparently unhappy about PBS’ recent “Frontline” investigative news program on WikiLeaks.

Google: At least 84 instances of malware have been discovered in the company’s Android Market app store in the last three months. In March Google removed 50 applications from the store that contained malicious code embedded in legitimate applications. Over the Memorial Day weekend Google was forced to pull an additional 34 smart phone applications off Android Market because of suspected malware infections. Google’s security woes don’t stop there. In early June, Google disclosed that Chinese hackers targeted the email accounts of top U.S. officials and hundreds of other prominent people in a fresh computer attack certain to intensify growing concern about the security of the Internet. The victims, including government and military personnel, Asian officials, Chinese activists and journalists, were tricked into sharing their Gmail passwords with “bad actors” based in China, according to a Google blog post. The attack’s goal was to read and forward the victims’ email.

Apple (yes, Apple!): The Mac OX X 10.x OS has been under attack for the last month from the malicious Mac Defender/Mac Guard malware. A few days ago, Apple engineers released a fix and 24 hours later the hackers struck again with a new virus variant called Mindinstall.pkg which is specifically designed to bypass Apple security.



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